The History Of The Porsche Sub-959 Supercar Is Told In 965

There was somewhat of a golden age for high-performance automobiles in the early 1990s. Nissan introduced the third-generation (R32) Skyline GT-R in 1989. This car was a turbocharged “giant-killer” that was fitted with various pieces of racing technology. One year later, Honda released the NSX, which was a visceral mid-engined supercar that was as easy to drive as a Civic. Then Ferrari released the F355, which had the first production paddle-shift gearbox and a wild 8,500 rpm V8 engine.

These automobiles burnt brightly, but there is one that is kept concealed in a secure facility close to Zuffenhausen that could have put out all of the fires. It was envisioned as “a cheaper successor to the 959,” according to Dieter Landenberger, who is the head of corporate history for the Volkswagen Group. Furthermore, it was intended to serve as a standalone replacement for the 930 Turbo.

The History Of The Porsche Sub 959 Supercar Is Told In 965 1

The narrative of 965 is one of game-changing technology and thinking beyond the box, noble ambition and harsh business reality (the single surviving prototype, for example, has an Audi V8 engine). However, the 964 Turbo and the 993 Turbo owe at least some of their success to this ill-fated hero. In this post, we will investigate the history of the 965 and examine at the legacy it has left behind.

In addition, the 911 Turbo faced competition that was somewhat different from those of the 911 Carrera and the SC that came after it. It competed head-to-head with major league supercars such as the Aston Martin V8 Vantage, the Ferrari 512 BB, and the Lamborghini Countach. In spite of the odds, the hot-rodded Porsche 911 was able to hold its own in terms of speed and bedroom-wall splendour, and it eventually became one of the uncontested symbols of the 1980s. Who among us can imagine the King’s Road of the Thatcher period or Wall Street during the Reagan era without seeing a Guards red 930 Turbo?

The word “hypercar” wasn’t created until after the McLaren F1 was introduced in 1992, therefore the golden age of free-market capitalism was also responsible for the birth of a new generation of even more powerful supercars. These machines, which were spearheaded by the Porsche 959 and the Ferrari F40, set new standards in terms of power, performance, and price. The title of the article that appeared on the front of CAR magazine in July 1988 after the publication had tested the competition from Germany and Italy was “ANOTHER WORLD.”

The 959 was a technological tour of force, in contrast to the unrefined and straightforward F40. It featured a computer-controlled Porsche-Steuer Kupplung (PSK) four-wheel drive system, electrically adjustable dampers, variable ride height, body panels made of Kevlar, magnesium wheels with hollow spokes, and a lot of other advanced technologies. However, while having a list price in the UK of 145,000 pounds, the actual cost of bringing each model to market was double that amount.

Let’s start back in 1975 with the very first 911 Turbo, which had a 3.0-litre engine. It stood out visually and physically from the rest of the 911 lineup with features like as its broad body and whale tail, as well as its 260 horsepower output. In acknowledgement of this fact, Porsche assigned the Turbo its own internal Typ number, 930. It was the last roadgoing 911 that was designated as such until the 964 was released in 1989 — although, in the United States, it was actually sold as the 930 Turbo Carrera.

The History Of The Porsche Sub 959 Supercar Is Told In 965 2

In addition, the 911 Turbo faced competition that was somewhat different from those of the 911 Carrera and the SC that came after it. It competed head-to-head with major league supercars such as the Aston Martin V8 Vantage, the Ferrari 512 BB, and the Lamborghini Countach. In spite of the odds, the hot-rodded Porsche 911 was able to hold its own in terms of speed and bedroom-wall splendour, and it eventually became one of the uncontested symbols of the 1980s. Who among us can imagine the King’s Road of the Thatcher period or Wall Street during the Reagan era without seeing a Guards red 930 Turbo?

The word “hypercar” wasn’t created until after the McLaren F1 was introduced in 1992, therefore the golden age of free-market capitalism was also responsible for the birth of a new generation of even more powerful supercars. These machines, which were spearheaded by the Porsche 959 and the Ferrari F40, set new standards in terms of power, performance, and price. The title of the article that appeared on the front of CAR magazine in July 1988 after the publication had tested the competition from Germany and Italy was “ANOTHER WORLD.”

The 959 was a technological tour of force, in contrast to the unrefined and straightforward F40. It featured a computer-controlled Porsche-Steuer Kupplung (PSK) four-wheel drive system, electrically adjustable dampers, variable ride height, body panels made of Kevlar, magnesium wheels with hollow spokes, and a lot of other advanced technologies. However, while having a list price in the UK of 145,000 pounds, the actual cost of bringing each model to market was double that amount.

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